Decontamination #11: New, reimagined and modified instruments

FullSizeRender
Instruments/speakers from David Pocknee’s String Trio No.1

Decontamination #11: New, reimagined and modified instruments

12 December 2017, 2000, CNRR, RNCM – TICKETS HERE

One for Solo Violin – Nam June Paik
Callum Coomber (violin)

la roche mère moutonne – Kelly Jayne Jones
Gavin Osborn (flute), Kelly Jayne Jones (rocks)

Taasian – Amir Sadeghi Konjani
Jacob Barns (prepared cello)

String Trio No.1 – David Pocknee
Shoal (Callum Coomber, Rosalind Ridout & Lucy Nolan)

Booklet: visual-audio-thing – Claudia Molitor
Video with soundtrack

offset ii – Nocturne !@#$% – Bofan Ma
Eldad Diamant – accordion and score objects

Fixations – Eleanor Cully
Shoal (Callum Coomber, Rosalind Ridout & Lucy Nolan)

Soundspace: Wonder Inn 30/10/2017 – Carmel Smickersgill, Stephen Morris, Adrian Wong and Johnathan Heyes
Ottis Enokido Lineham (conductor), Wei Ling Thong, Will McGahon, Izzy Baker (violins), Elizabeth Elliott (cello), Aidan Marsden, Callum Coomber (wine glasses)

Claudia Molitor from Booklet
From Booklet: visual-audio-thing – Claudia Molitor

 

Amir by MM
Amir Sadeghi Konjani (by MM)

Nam June Paik’s iconic 1962 Fluxus performance One for Solo Violin may be a reactionay destructive event (the sudden smashing of a violin), but it also hints at the possibilities of a creative and  performance practice untethered from restrictive instrumental tradition. Each of the pieces in this concert address Paik’s implied question by inventing or modifying instruments or their performance practice. Amir Sadeghi Konjani’s prepared cello connects tubes to the strings with springs and creates a natural spatialised delay (for him, instrumental shadowing). Claudia Molitor’s installation (here as a short audio/video presentation) and Bofan Ma’s new work employ the score itself as an instrument, in both cases playing games with the

Bofan Ma
Bofan Ma

position of the score and the resultant sound. Artist and improviser Kelly Jayne Jones shares a new piece she has devised in collaboration with Gavin Osborn; ‘a partially structured interaction between amplified rocks and flute. A counterbalance between bedrock and breath and an investigation into the fragile yet monstrous power of the human animal’ . David Pocknee’s playful response to a string trio is to design new instruments with strings and plastic cups. Carmel Smickersgill collaborates with architects Stephen Morris, Adrian Wong and Johnathan Heyes to create a piece of music in which a building is a compositional agent. Eleanor Cully’s Fixations brings us full circle. As with the Paik these pieces address/undermine traditional performance practice and, also like the Paik, they are defined by their brevity; these are pieces that hint at elusive possibilities.

kjj
Kelly Jayne Jones

The questions raised by Fluxus artists about traditionalism and conservatism were not limited to compositional/performance/artistic practice. Questions relating to commercialism, elitism, sex, gender and race (to scratch the surface) were also confronted. It’s an easy provocation to raise this in the context of a concert at a British conservatoire. I don’t want to trivialise these issues through a token gesture but do want to explore work that aspires to greater equality as well as reflect on my own commitments for the Decontamination series. I’m happy that these issues seem so central to the conversation around new music at the moment and, happily, increasingly at the RNCM as well.

For me it is entirely humbling that such a diverse range of artists from all over the world (including experienced professionals and RNCM students) have given their time and energy just for the love of doing somethign worthwhile. I can’t wait.

Carmel Smickersgill
Carmel Smickersgill

 

 

 

 

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