DECONTAMINATION#1 – Darkness & Light

I’m very excited that the first of a series of concerts I’m curating with the Royal Northern College of Music takes place this coming Tuesday:

Tuesday 28 October 2014 – RNCM Studio Theatre – 20.00

Mortuos Plango, Vivos Voco – Jonathan Harvey

“In iij. Noct.” (String Quartet No.3) – Georg Friedrich Haas
Performed by The Solem String Quartet

Gran Coda Andante – Robert Curgenven

RNCM concert information here and box office here.

 

georg-friedrich-haas102~_v-image512_-6a0b0d9618fb94fd9ee05a84a1099a13ec9d3321
Georg Friedrich Haas

I’m looking forward to hearing these three pieces together. “In iij. Noct” is a string quartet by Georg Friedrich Haas than can last for at least 35 minutes and potentially considerable longer. The instrumentalists are positioned around the audience and play the modular score, as much text and instructions as notated music, in an order decided during the performance by a musical negotiation of the materials. It is played in pitch darkness, an intense and demanding situation for performers and audience, and oscillates between beautiful spectral harmonies and textures and more dissonant music of various kinds structurally punctuated by a quotation from Gesualdo.

 

Jonathan Harvey
Jonathan Harvey

This substantial quartet is framed by two purely electronic pieces. Jonathan Harvey’s monumental Mortuos Plango: Vivos Voco is inspired in part by the inscription in the church bell at Winchester Cathedral (the wonderfully evocative Horas Avolantes Numero, Mortuos Plango: Vivos ad Preces Voco – I count the fleeing hours, I lament the dead: the living I call to prayer) as well as the sound and spectral quality of the bell and his son’s chorister voice and singing. The music is realised through eight speakers placed around the audience – in part imagining what it would be to make music inside this massive church bell.

 

Robert Curgenven
Robert Curgenven

 

Finally Robert Curgenven, a sound artist living on the south coast, has made a track called Gran Coda Andante of his amazing album OLTRE. This short piece takes a dubplate he made in Milan (a dubplate is a one off single sided vinyl record – slightly softer than a normal record) and then uses this in live performances until the sound start to degrade. This meditative drone-based piece examines how the sound changes as this record gradually falls apart.

 

 

 

I’m delighted that The Solem String Quartet have taken on this unusual and demanding work. They are recent graduates of the RNCM and University of Manchester, are wonderful players and an exciting up and coming quartet (they have had numerous recent successes including winning the very prestigious 2014 Royal Overseas League Ensemble Competition).

SOLEM
The Solem Quartet
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